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HS2 reveals Old Oak Common station box details

Deep excavations will be key to delivery of HS2’s Old Oak Common station, according to details for the development that have just been released.

HS2 has said that the high-speed platforms will be situated underground with an integrated connection to the adjoining conventional station at ground level via a shared overbridge providing seamless connections between HS2 and Elizabeth line (Crossrail) trains, to Heathrow and central London.

The two parts of the station will be linked by a “light and airy” concourse designed by WSP and architect Wilkinson Eyre, which HS2 has said is inspired by Old Oak Common’s industrial heritage as a former Great Western railway depot.

WSP project director for Old Oak Common Adrian Tooth said: “As well as being a catalyst for regeneration within the wider area, the new HS2 Old Oak Common station will become a landmark destination featuring an area of urban realm to the west of London. Our design responds to the station’s function, recognising that more than half of those using the station will interchange between the below ground HS2 and the Elizabeth Line. The station form takes inspiration from our Victorian railway heritage and the juxtaposition between the above and below ground railways.”

The six 450m HS2 platforms will be built in a 1km long underground box, with twin tunnels taking high speed trains east to the terminus at Euston and west to the outskirts of London. Material excavated during work on the tunnels will be removed by rail from the nearby former Willesden Euroterminal depot.

Clearance work on the station site has started and construction is expected to start later this year.

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