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Public invited to view Glasgow geothermal plans

Plans to put geothermal energy to the test in the Clyde Gateway area of Glasgow have moved forward with full details set to be unveiled to the public early next month.

The UK Geoenergy Observatories Project led by the Natural Environment Research Council and the British Geological Survey (BGS) aims to explore the potential of geothermal energy through development of the Glasgow Geothermal Energy Research Field Site.

The £9M scheme is part of the £31M Geoenergy Observatories Project that will establish new centres for research into the subsurface environment and provide opportunities to research how natural processes can control resource availability, and how natural resources can be used responsibly for present and future generations.

The Glasgow scheme will look at the benefit of geothermal energy to local communities, as well as offering the opportunity for other areas of innovation and research into the subsurface. The project aims to create an opportunity for research in relation to the geothermal energy potential of the warm waters in the large expanse of disused coal mines under Glasgow. It may be possible to use that water for geothermal energy to heat homes and businesses.

The field site proposed for the Clyde Gateway area would comprise of a number of boreholes of various depths to create the opportunity to research the area’s geology and underground water systems. Measurements would be taken from boreholes, such as temperature, water movement and water chemistry, and the data will be monitored and assessed in the coming years.

“This has the potential to be a world-class research site attracting globally leading scientists and engineers, building on Glasgow’s history as a trailblazing city of science. Realising the potential of geothermal energy in Clyde Gateway may create opportunities for the UK to lead the way in providing safe and sustainable energy for former mining communities around the world,” said BGS executive director John Luddon.

 

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